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Cosmos 5

NSSDCA/COSPAR ID: 1962-020A

Description

Cosmos 5, an automatic geophysical station, was one of a series of Soviet Earth satellites whose purpose was to study outer space, the upper layers of the atmosphere, and the Earth. Scientific data and measurements were relayed to earth by multichannel telemetry systems equipped with space-borne memory units.

It was reportedly damaged by the Starfish Prime high-altitude nuclear blast on 9 July 1962, and may have failed by November 1962. The orbit decayed on 2 May 1963.

Starfish Prime

Starfish Prime was an American high-altitude nuclear test that took place on 9 July 1962. Launch took place from Johnston atoll in the Pacific Ocean (about 1330 km southwest of Honolulu) at 8:46:28 UT on 9 July 1962 (10:46:28 pm, 8 July local time) on a Thor rocket carrying a W49 thermonuclear warhead. Detonation of the warhead occurred at 09:00:09 UT on 9 July (11:00:09 pm local time, 8 July) at an altitude of 400 km. Total yield was 1.4 megatons. The explosion, occurring at a geomagnetic latitude 10.5 degrees, generated an electromagnetic pulse and generated large amounts of charged particles. These had the effect of damaging many operating satellites, both at the time of the blast and later, as the energetic particles remained trapped in the Earth's magnetic field, forming an artificial radiation belt that persisted for many days after the explosion. These damaged satellites include TRAAC, Transit-4B, Ariel 1, Cosmos 5, Telstar 1, Explorers 14 and 15, and possibly Injun 1, OSO-1, Alouette 1, and ANNA-1B.

Alternate Names

  • 00297
  • 1962 Upsilon 1
  • Cosmos5
  • Sputnik 15

Facts in Brief

Launch Date: 1962-05-28
Launch Vehicle: Kosmos-2I
Launch Site: Kapustin Yar, U.S.S.R
Mass: 280 kg

Funding Agency

  • Unknown (U.S.S.R)

Discipline

  • Earth Science

Additional Information

Questions and comments about this spacecraft can be directed to: Coordinated Request and User Support Office

 
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