SPACEWARN
Bulletin
A monthly publication of the National Space Science Data Center/World Data Center for Satellite Information
No. 593                                                                                                                               01 Apr. 2003

SPACEWARN Activities

All information in this publication was received between 1 March 2003 and 31 March 2003.

A. List of New International Designations and Launch Dates (UTC).

USSPACECOM Catalog numbers are in parentheses.
  COSPAR/WWAS USSPACECOM  SPACECRAFT              LAUNCH
    INT.ID    CAT. #      NAME                   DATE (UT)
  ---------------------------------------------------------
   2003-010A    (27704)  Navstar 52 (USA 168) 31 MARCH 2003
   2003-009B    (27699)  IGS 1B               28 MARCH 2003
   2003-009A    (27698)  IGS 1A               28 MARCH 2003
   2003-008A    (27691)  USA 167              11 MARCH 2003

B. Text of Launch Announcements.

2003-010A Navstar 52, also known as USA 168 and as GPS 2R-9, is an American Global Positioning Satellite that was launched by a Delta 2 rocket from Cape Canaveral AFS at 22:09 UT on 31 March 2003. It will replace the aging GPS 2-5 in the fleet (of 28 satellites). Sec. C-2 below provides more information on the fleet. The initial orbital parameters were period 355.6 min, apogee 20,228.8 km, perigee 187.83 km, and inclination 39.0°.
2003-009A, 2003-009B IGS 1A (Information Gathering Satellite 1A) and IGS 1B are two Japanese reconaissance satellites that were launched by as H-2A rocket from Tanegashima Space Center at 01:27 UT on 28 March 2003. They may be used to monitor for nuclear explosions and missile launches in nearby countries in addition to global natural disasters and hurricanes. As such, according to the Japanese Defense Ministry, the launch is not in violation of the Japan-N. Korea declaration of September 2002. One of the two spacecraft uses optical cameras with a resolution of one meter; the other uses synthetic aperture radar to provide images at a resolution of a few meters. No information is available as to which satellite carries which instrument. Initial orbital parameters of both were close: period 94.4 min, apogee 490.9 km, perigee 485.5 km, and inclination 97.3°.
2003-008A USA 167, also known as DSCS 3A3, is an American geostationary military communications spacecraft of the DSCS 3 constellation that will provide very secure global links to the military. It was launched by a Delta 4 rocket from Cape Canaveral AFS at 00:59 UT. These DSCS 3 spacecraft are triaxially-stabilized spacecraft with solar power of 1.24 kW. They operate at six SHF frequencies between 40 and 85 MHz. The parking longitude is unavailable.

C. Spacecraft Particularly Suited for International Participation

  1. Spacecraft with essentially continuous radio beacons on frequencies less than 150 MHz, or higher frequencies if especially suited for ionospheric or geodetic studies. (NNSS denotes U.S. Navy Navigational Satellite System. Updates or corrections to the list are possible only with information from the user community.)

    Note: The full list appeared in SPX 545. The list will not be repeated in future issues until significantly revised again.

  2. Global Positioning System satellites useful for navigational purposes and geodetic studies.

    High precision (<20 cm) GPS constellation tracking data obtained from the network of about 400 dedicated global stations that are of interest to geodetic study may be obtained through the following services provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS). The IGS is a service of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG).

         FTP:    igscb.jpl.nasa.gov  [directory /igscb]
         WWW:    http://igscb.jpl.nasa.gov/
         E-mail: igscb@cobra.jpl.nasa.gov
    

    The standard format of the GPS situation appeared in SPACEWARN Bulletin No. 518. It will not be repeated since an excellent source of trajectory- and science-related GPS information is at:

    http://www.colorado.edu/geography/gcraft/notes/gps/gps_f.html

    It provides many links to GPS related databases.

  3. Russian Global Navigational (Positioning) Spacecraft, GLONASS constellation. (SPACEWARN requests updates/additions from readers to this list.)

    All GLONASS spacecraft are in the general Cosmos series. The Cosmos numbers invoked by USSPACECOM have often differed from the numbers (NNNN) associated in Russia; when different, the USSPACECOM Cosmos numbers are shown in parentheses. The corresponding GLONASS numbers are Russian numbers, followed by the numbers in parentheses that are sometimes attributed to them outside Russia.

    The operating frequencies in MHz are computed from the channel number K. Frequencies (MHz) = 1602.0 + 0.5625K and L2 = 1246.0 + 0.4375K.

    The standard format of the GLONASS situation last appeared in SPACEWARN Bulletin No. 545. It will not be repeated in view of the excellent updated source at: http://www.glonass-ianc.rsa.ru/ maintained by the Information-Analytical Center (IAC), Russian Space Agency.

    Dr. Richard Langley of the University of New Brunswick, Canada has provided the following GLONASS status on 18 March 2003:

                              GLONASS Constellation Status
                                       (03-03-18)
    
    GLONASS    Kosmos     Internat.  NORAD Plane Channel Almanac  Launch   Status
    Numbers    Numbers       ID     Catalog              Number    Date    (Date
                                     Number              (Slot)   (UTC)  withdrawn)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     49 249  2111         1990-110C   21008                      8-Dec-90 15-Aug-96
     50 750  2139         1991-025A   21216                      4-Apr-91 14-Nov-94
     51 753  2140         1991-025B   21217                      4-Apr-91  4-Jun-93
     52 754  2141         1991-025C   21218                      4-Apr-91 16-Jun-92
     53 768  2177         1992-005A   21853                     29-Jan-92 29-Jun-93
     54 769  2178         1992-005B   21854                     29-Jan-92 25-Jun-97
     55 771  2179         1992-005C   21855                     29-Jan-92 21-Dec-96
     56 774  2206 (2204)  1992-047A   22056                     30-Jul-92 26-Aug-96
     57 756  2204 (2205)  1992-047B   22057                     30-Jul-92  4-Aug-97
     58 772  2205 (2206)  1992-047C   22058                     30-Jul-92 27-Aug-94
     59 773  2234         1993-010A   22512                     17-Feb-93 17-Aug-94
     60 757  2236 (2235)  1993-010B   22513                     17-Feb-93 23-Aug-97
     61 759  2235 (2236)  1993-010C   22514                     17-Feb-93  4-Aug-97
     62 760  2276 (2275)  1994-021A   23043                     11-Apr-94  9-Sep-99
     63 761  2277 (2276)  1994-021B   23044                     11-Apr-94 29-Aug-97
     64 758  2275 (2277)  1994-021C   23045                     11-Apr-94 15-Jan-00
     65 767  2287         1994-050A   23203                     11-Aug-94  3-Feb-99
     66 775  2289 (2288)  1994-050B   23204                     11-Aug-94 28-Sep-00
     67 770  2288 (2289)  1994-050C   23205                     11-Aug-94 15-Jan-00
     68 763  2295 (2294)  1994-076A   23396                     20-Nov-94  5-Oct-99
     69 764  2296 (2295)  1994-076B   23397                     20-Nov-94 30-Nov-99
     70 762  2294 (2296)  1994-076C   23398                     20-Nov-94 19-Nov-99
     71 765  2307         1995-009A   23511                      7-Mar-95 19-Nov-99
     72 766  2308         1995-009B   23512                      7-Mar-95  5-Feb-01
     73 777  2309         1995-009C   23513                      7-Mar-95 26-Dec-97
     74 780  2316         1995-037A   23620                     24-Jul-95  6-Apr-99
     75 781  2317         1995-037B   23621                     24-Jul-95 15-Oct-01
     76 785  2318         1995-037C   23622                     24-Jul-95  6-Apr-01
     77 776  2323         1995-068C   23736                     14-Dec-95 28-Nov-00
     78 778  2324         1995-068B   23735                     14-Dec-95 30-Dec-01
     79 782  2325         1995-068A   23734                     14-Dec-95 15-Oct-01
     80 786  2362 (2364)  1998-077C   25595  1      7       7   30-Dec-98    UNH
     81 784  2363         1998-077B   25594  1      8       8   30-Dec-98    OK
     82 779  2364 (2362)  1998-077A   25593                     30-Dec-98  8-Jul-02
     83 783  2374 (2376)  2000-063C   26566  3     10      18   13-Oct-00    OK
     84 787  2375 (2374)  2000-063A   26564  3      5      17   13-Oct-00    OK
     85 788  2376 (2375)  2000-063B   26565  3      3      24   13-Oct-00    OK
     86 790  2380         2001-053C   26989  1      9       6    1-Dec-01    UNH
     87 789  2381         2001-053B   26988  1     12       3    1-Dec-01    OK
     88 711  2382         2001-053A   26987  1      2       5    1-Dec-01    UNH
     89 791  2394         2002-060A   27617  3     10      22   25-Dec-02    OK
     90 792  2395 (2396)  2002-060C   27619  3      5      21   25-Dec-02    OK
     91 793  2396 (2395)  2002-060B   27618  3     11      23   25-Dec-02    OK
    
    
    Notes
    -----
    1.  NORAD Catalog Number is also known as U.S. Space Command (USSPACECOM)
        object number.
    2.  The numbers listed first in the "Kosmos Numbers" column are the designators
        assigned by the Russian Federation.  Where these differ from the
        designators assigned by the United States, the latter are given in
        parentheses.
    3.  Channel number, k, indicates L1 and L2 carrier frequencies:
           L1   =  1602. + 0.5625 k  (MHz)
           L2   =  1246. + 0.4375 k  (MHz)
    4.  Status codes:
        Res = satellite not in service but held in reserve
        OK  = satellite fully operational.
        UNH = satellite currently flagged unhealthy.
        CHK = satellite undergoing checkout and commissioning.
        The date listed is the date the satellite was removed from service (Moscow
        Time) as reported by the Coordinational Scientific Information Center,
        Moscow.
    5.  All GLONASS satellites employ cesium atomic clocks.
    6.  The first GLONASS satellite was launched on 12-Oct-82.  GLONASS 1 through
        79 are no longer in service.
    7.  GLONASS 40 and 41 were launched with the Etalon 1 laser ranging satellite.
        GLONASS 42 and 43 were launched with Etalon 2.
    8.  The GLONASS numbering scheme used in this table includes the 8 "dummy"
        satellites orbited as ballast along with "real" satellites on the first 7
        GLONASS launches.  The second number in the "GLONASS Numbers" column is
        that assigned by the Russian Space Forces.
    9.  New GLONASS channel allocations were introduced in September 1993 aimed at
        reducing interference to radio astronomy.  Note the use of the same channel
        on pairs of antipodal satellites.
    10. The most recent triple GLONASS launch took place on 25-Dec-02 at
        07:37:58 UTC (ref. NAGU 086-021226).  GLONASS 791 became active on
        21-Jan-03 at 07:00 UTC (ref. NAGU 002-030121).  GLONASS 792 and 793 became
        active on 31-Jan-03 at 00:30 UTC (ref. NAGUs 003-030131 and 004-030131).
        All three satellites are regular GLONASS satellites (not GLONASS-M).
    11. GLONASS 711, the first GLONASS-M satellite in orbit, has been set unhealthy
        since launch. However, its signals, at times, are usable.
    12. Number of GLONASS satellites currently in service: 11.
    13. Number of GLONASS satellites currently usable: 8.
    14. Status of satellites compiled by Richard B. Langley, Dept. of Geodesy and
        Geomatics Engineering, University of New Brunswick with the assistance of
        Peter Daly, University of Leeds.
    
  4. Visually bright objects.

    See http://www.space-track.org/perl/bulk_files.pl. Users must register. Conditions apply.

  5. Actual decays/landings of payload spacecraft and rocket bodies (R/B) only. No further information is available.
    Designations         Common Name                  Decay Date (2003)
    
    2003-002D (27645)  R/B Delta 2                            18 March
    1997-030C (24838)  IRIDIUM 09                             11 March
    1997-031B (24847)  R/B Ariane 44P                         04 March
    
  6. 60-day Decay Predictions.

    See http://www.space-track.org/perl/60day_decay_predict.pl. Users must register for access. Conditions apply

  7. Miscellaneous Items. (This section contains information/data that are entered on occasion and may not be repeated in each issue of the SPACEWARN Bulletin.)

  8. Related NSSDC resources.

    NSSDC/WDC for Satellite Information is an archival center for science data from many spacecraft. Many space physics datasets are on-line for electronic access through:
    http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/

    For off-line data, please contact the Request Office, NSSDC, Code 690.1, NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, U.S.A., for specific information (nssdc-request@listserv.gsfc.nasa.gov). Information on the current status of the instruments on board from the investigators will be most welcomed. Precomputed trajectory files and orbital parameters of many magnetospheric and heliospheric science-payload spacecraft may be obtained from:
    http://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/miscellaneous/orbits/

    Other files of interest for Earth-centered spacecraft can be generated via the URL,
    http://sscweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/

    Programs related to the heliospheric spacecraft trajectories can be executed through the URL:
    http://cohoweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/helios/heli.html

    Magnetospheric, Planetary, and Astronomical science data from many spacecraft may be accessed through links from the URL:
    http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/

SPACEWARN Bulletin index About the SPACEWARN Bulletin About Spacecraft Categories NSSDC home page

Questions/comments about the content of these pages should be directed to:
The World Warning Agency for Satellites, wwas@mail630.gsfc.nasa.gov
National Space Science Data Center, Mail Code 633
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771

Dr. Edwin Bell, II
NASA Official: Dr. Ed Grayzeck
V1.0, 02 April 2003
Last updated: 02 May 2003, EVB II